How to become a human rights lawyer panel discussion

Join us for a panel event where human rights lawyers will discuss pathways to a career in human rights law.

The event is finished.

Date

23 Aug 2021
Expired!

Time

6:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Speakers

  • Dr Faith Gordon
    Dr Faith Gordon

    Dr Faith Gordon is a Senior Lecturer in Law at the ANU College of Law, The Australian National University. She has previously held academic positions at Queen’s University Belfast, University of Westminster and Monash University. Faith is the Director of the Interdisciplinary International Youth Justice Network which she established in 2016 and a co-founder and co-moderator of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology’s Thematic Group on children, young people and the criminal justice system. She is also an Associate Research Fellow at the Information Law & Policy Centre, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, London and Justice and Technoscience Lab, School of Regulation and Global Governance. Faith has international expertise and research experience in youth justice; media representations; children’s rights; criminal law; digital technologies; media regulation.

    Research Themes
    » Criminal Law
    » Human Rights Law and Policy
    » Law and Social Justice
    » Law and Technology
    Research interests
    children and the law, children’s rights, Criminal Justice, Criminal Law, Law and Social Justice, Law and technology, Social media, victims
    Biography
    Dr Faith Gordon is a Senior Lecturer in Law at the ANU College of Law, The Australian National University. She has previously held academic positions at Queen’s University Belfast, University of Westminster and Monash University. Faith is the Director of the Interdisciplinary International Youth Justice Network which she established in 2016 and a co-founder and co-moderator of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology’s Thematic Group on children, young people and the criminal justice system. She is also an Associate Research Fellow at the Information Law & Policy Centre, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, London and Justice and Technoscience Lab, School of Regulation and Global Governance. Faith has international expertise and research experience in youth justice; media representations; children’s rights; criminal law; digital technologies; media regulation.

    Faith was lead researcher on large-scale ESRC Knowledge Exchange Project: Identifying and Challenging the Negative Media Representation of Children and Young People in Northern Ireland, which involved over 170 children and young people, as well as industry professionals and youth advocates. She was also Co-I on a research project on Older Victims of Crime and Crime Clearance Rates, funded by the Commissioner for Older People in Northern Ireland. Faith has also been a researcher for The Hillsborough Independent Panel; the Childhood, Transition and Social Justice Initiative; Save the Children and the Children’s Law Centre in Northern Ireland. She is a former Trustee of Headliners UK, a youth and media charity.

    Faith’s current research is funded by the Australian Research Council, the Australasian Institute for Judicial Administration and the Society of Legal Scholars (UK).

    Faith’s first sole-authored monograph: Children, Young People and the Press in a Transitioning Society: Representations, Reactions and Criminalisation, was published as part of the Socio-Legal Series, Palgrave Macmillan in 2018. She has co-edited a collection on Leading Works in Law and Social Justice for Routledge’s Leading Works in Law series published in 2021. Faith has extensively published peer-reviewed articles and book reviews as well as book chapters in edited collections. She also sits on a number of international editorial boards, such as Communications Law and is book review editor for the journal – Law, Technology, Humans.

    Faith has recently published on the topics of lifelong anonymity and pre-charge identification of minors in the digital age. Her research on police release of children’s images has been referred to by the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (2015), in the Northern Ireland High Court and in the UK Court of Appeal (2019).

  • Emma Towney
    Emma Towney

    Emma joined Canberra Community Law (CCL) in March 2019. In March 2021, Emma commenced as Program Manager of the Dhurranwang Aboriginal Human Rights Program. She is a proud Wiradjuri woman who has been residing in Canberra on Ngunnawal Country for the last 9 years. Prior to commencing at CCL, Emma worked in various legal roles within a Federal Government Department. Emma was admitted as a Lawyer in 2013 and holds a Master of Laws from ANU.

    Emma is also currently the Chair and a founding member of the ACT Law Society Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Justice Committee. This Committee was established to monitor and advocate on legal issues that impact Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People both within the ACT community and beyond.

    Emma’s current work at CCL sees her work within a small team to provide advice and representation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients in the ACT on social and community housing, social security and race discrimination. Her work is informed by human rights principles of participation, inclusion and self-determination and involves using human rights legislation and principles to support her client’s legal matters.

  • Heidi Yates
    Heidi Yates

    Heidi Yates is the ACT Victims of Crime Commissioner at the ACT Human Rights Commissions. She was also a solicitor and leading advocate for family violence law reform in the ACT. She has advocated for the development and funding of free legal services across Australia (particularly for survivors of family violence) and is known as a trailblazer in gender-related law reform.

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